Butoh workshops

The 3rd Butoh Workshop is just finished.
Now stay tuned and sign in for our Newsletter!

Previous Butoh workshops at CLOUD/Danslab:

Natsu Nakajima – from 14 to 18 September 2016
Yuko Kaseki from 20 – 24 April 2016

Natsu Nakajima from 18 – 21 August 2015


After the  success of the first workshop of Butoh Master Natsu Nakajima, we continue to organize Butoh workshops in CLOUD/Danslab. We are happy to have finished her second workshop, during the European tour of Natsu Nakajima in September 2016. Read more here.

Ankoku Butoh (暗黒舞踏) – dance of darkness 
Hijikata Tatsumi, who passed away in 1986, is the originator of Ankoku Butoh; and Ohno Kazuo (1906-2010), an extraordinary and rare dancer, was his great collaborator. Hijikata was like Picasso; every season, he would change the style of his works like a chameleon. This partly explains why each of his disciples developed very different working styles. Natsu Nakajima was among the founding members of the Ankoku Butoh movement and belongs to the first generation.

Ankoku Butoh is a movement in the performing arts that was born riding on the wave of counter-culture in post-war Japan in 1950-1960s. Now in Europe, and some other countries, the term “Ankoku” has been dropped from “Ankoku Butoh”, and the term “Butoh” has become more closely associated with these countries. Losing “ankoku” has resulted in losing sight of the original ideology from when Ankoku Butoh was created and has given rise to many misunderstandings and misinterpretations.

Whatever you may call it, darkness, spirituality, or even something formless, something that cannot be put into words, or simply, the unconscious, the inexplicable, the destroyed and disappeared… …we are actually talking about something that cannot be seen. Something that Hijikata called “ankoku”. Hijikata liked to use the word “yami” (shadowy darkness). It gives the feeling of something that is full of contradiction and irrationality, somewhere like the “chaos of eternal beginning”… To deconstruct Ankoku Butoh with “language” is moving further and further away from the joy of early Ankoku Butoh’s integral quest for “the body as the scene of fulfilled life”.
(from the lecture of Natsu Nakajima)