THE UNCONSCIOUS MOVE | Residency Sebastian Pickering Pedersen

10-21 June 2019

PRESENTATION : 21 June at (TBC)

Open Morning Labs : 11/13/15/18/20 June from 9:30 till 11:00

Sebastian Pickering Pedersen

Danish/Canadian dancer, dance-maker and musician, b. 1994, Aarhus, Denmark. He has a varied background as a dancer, classical guitarist, fencer and white water canoeist.

As a choreographer he was recently artist in Residency at Performing Arts Platform in Denmark researching photography vs. movement/choreography with his collective aNorange, with whom he is currently working towards the premiere of their first longer piece. As a dancer he will be working with Icelandic Dance Company in January and Nicole Beutler (NB Projects) later in spring.

He is currently working on his movement research concerning involuntary/unconscious movement and has a flair for floor work and physical theatre.

During 2 weeks of exploration and creation at CLOUD, I will be working with different physical, theatrical and visual aspects of unconsciousness. Building on previous research concerning “Involuntary/unconscious movement” I will be continuing to work with physical tasks aiming to provoke the body to move without the performer consciously choosing to do so. The includes working with balance (loss), manipulation of the body and provoking physical reactions. I wish to combine this with a more theatrical approach by imitating states of consciousness – how can we theatrically express being conscious or unconscious? Can we create or imitate a state of in between – eg. sleep walking, being drunk, constantly switching between loosing and gaining consciousness?

The aim of this residency is to start transforming material and tasks from a practical movement research into a more artistic direction by finding out what images and associations appear from the exploration of physical and theatrical consciousness. By working with the theme and its tasks, what references might appear? What scenes can be built? What aesthetic does it have – does it have an aesthetic at all? Does it bring a context of its own, or does it need to be put in a certain “staged” context to have a meaning?